Category: Davids Classical CDs

The Miro Quartet’s new CD is a mixed bag

The Miro Quartet’s new CD is a mixed bag

The Miro Quartet has been around since 1995, and astonishingly, 3 out of the 4 original members are still part of the group today. (The current 2nd violinist joined them in 2011). They haven’t made many recordings over the years, but two are especially memorable. Their 2003 recording of George Crumb’s Black Angels (part of the “Complete …

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Unimaginative Dutilleux lacks atmosphere and allure

Unimaginative Dutilleux lacks atmosphere and allure

I had high hopes for this release. I love these 3 masterpieces from Dutilleux‘s first creative period, and to have them all on one CD (over 78 minutes of music) is very enticing. They are ingeniously scored with countless orchestral effects (especially in the strings), imaginatively exploiting all the color and atmosphere available from every …

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Fantastic “new” string quartet – Quartuor Arod

Fantastic “new” string quartet – Quartuor Arod

​Here’s another sensational French string quartet that I’ve recently discovered, which instantly joins two of my other favorite French string quartets at or near the top of the list – Quatuor Hanson and Quatuor Diotima. Although Quartuor Arod has been around awhile (10 years or so), only the two violinists remain the same today. So while …

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Manic vibrato frenzy continues in Wilson’s latest album for Strings

Manic vibrato frenzy continues in Wilson’s latest album for Strings

I recently wrote about Klaus Makela’s slick Debussy/Stravinsky Decca recording with the Orchestre de Paris, finding it superficial, completely devoid of character and interminably boring. And then there’s this – whatever it is John Wilson is doing with his Sinfonia of London strings and that manic vibrato. Oh it’s definitely recognizable in a way Makela’s is …

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A new Viennese string quartet – Chaos

A new Viennese string quartet – Chaos

Great name for a string quartet! It certainly got my attention (as did the repertoire) and enticed me to buy their debut recording which appears on a label new to me, Solo Musica, produced by University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna. Listening to this program, the first observation I made was the somewhat curious repertoire …

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A fitting tribute to a true legend – John Williams

A fitting tribute to a true legend – John Williams

I’m more than a fan. I think I’m even more than an aficionado. John Williams is an inspiration; a musical hero, really. And of course when I saw this production, I had to have it. Even though I have just about everything of his on CD (from original soundtracks, to Boston Pops albums and collections …

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Absolutely glorious. A delightful disc from beginning to end

Absolutely glorious. A delightful disc from beginning to end

Every once in a while a disc comes along which is so pleasant – and such a pleasant surprise – it brings smile after smile. This disc of orchestral music from the unjustly neglected British composer, Dorothy Howell, does just that. And that isn’t faint praise. This program is pure joy – endlessly fascinating to …

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Why bother?

Why bother?

I wouldn’t have even bothered with this CD – Decca is far from the esteemed label it once was 20 years ago. But since the Chicago Symphony has just announced this conductor will replace Riccardo Muti as its music director, I thought I’d give it a listen and see what ill-conceived decision they’re making this …

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Rewarding collection of French symphonic music

Rewarding collection of French symphonic music

There is a lot of wonderful music on this well-filled 2-CD set. (Each disc lasts more than 73 minutes.) It is all played with refinement and finesse by the Orchestre National de Lyon, led by their violinist-turned-conductor Nikolaj Szeps-Znaider, who does a fine job bringing it all to life. A lot of this music was unknown …

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A rather nice program (including one real gem) in the ongoing series from Neave Trio

A rather nice program (including one real gem) in the ongoing series from Neave Trio

​A Room of Her Own is a new collection of music for Violin, Cello and Piano, played by Neave Trio, which continues their exploration of Trios by female composers. I greatly enjoyed their previous Chandos album in the series, Her Voice, which included wonderfully original and imaginatively creative trios by Louise Farrenc, Amy Beach and Rebecca Clarke. …

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